February 24, 2014
For those in the Central Time zone!

For those in the Central Time zone!

(Source: hardcoremilkman, via kateordie)

February 23, 2014
prettygirlsinmytardis:

"Swedes are shaking up their language with a new gender-neutral pronoun. The pronoun, “hen,” allows speakers and writers to refer to a person without including reference to a person’s gender. This month, the pronoun made a big leap toward mainstream usage when it was added to the country’s National Encyclopedia."

prettygirlsinmytardis:

"Swedes are shaking up their language with a new gender-neutral pronoun. The pronoun, “hen,” allows speakers and writers to refer to a person without including reference to a person’s gender. This month, the pronoun made a big leap toward mainstream usage when it was added to the country’s National Encyclopedia."

(via projectqueer)

4:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z4g1Ry18JTTuW
  
Filed under: Into it 
February 22, 2014
thepeoplesrecord:

Watch “Pay it no Mind,” a documentary about trans activist & Stonewall Rebellion revolutionary Marsha P. Johnson, here.
With her final interview from 1992, Pay It No Mind captures the legendary gay/human rights activist as she recounts her life at the forefront of The Stonewall Riots in the 1960s, the creation of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) with Sylvia Rivera in the ’70s, and a New York City activist throughout the ’80s and early ’90s.
The film features interviews with Marsha, as well as in-depth interviews with gay activist Randy Wicker, former Cockettes performer Agosto Machado, author Michael Musto, Hot Peaches founder/performer, Jimmy Camicia, and Stonewall activists Bob Kohler, Danny Garvin, Tommy Lanigan-Schmidt, and Martin Boyce.

thepeoplesrecord:

Watch “Pay it no Mind,” a documentary about trans activist & Stonewall Rebellion revolutionary Marsha P. Johnson, here.

With her final interview from 1992Pay It No Mind captures the legendary gay/human rights activist as she recounts her life at the forefront of The Stonewall Riots in the 1960s, the creation of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) with Sylvia Rivera in the ’70s, and a New York City activist throughout the ’80s and early ’90s.

The film features interviews with Marsha, as well as in-depth interviews with gay activist Randy Wicker, former Cockettes performer Agosto Machado, author Michael MustoHot Peaches founder/performer, Jimmy Camicia, and Stonewall activists Bob KohlerDanny GarvinTommy Lanigan-Schmidt, and Martin Boyce.

(via filmantidote)

February 15, 2014
Chicago People: Drums?

Good morning, Tumblr! I’m working on an art thing. Its really exciting and fun and I’m waiting for a flier to tell you all or something, but FIRST AND FOREMOST can anyone help me with this small request:

Drums. Do you have some? A kick drum, floor tom, a cymbal and high hat are all I really need.

(Otherwise I’m using buckets. Which might be super fun but I stretch out my mind like whoa planning this stuff. Really need a producer side-kick.)

If you or anyone you know in/around Chicago has drums I can borrow for 2-3 days, please contact me!

Thank you.

February 12, 2014
Casting Call - Chicago

filmme-fatale:

My good friend Matt, who you might know as deadandimmortal, is currently working on a webseries called “Coffee Talk,” about two gay college friends discussing intimate guy things. They just put up a casting call for their next episode, and I highly recommend any of my male Chicago-based…

Hey, Filmme-Fatale got to this before I did!

Casting call for new episodes of Coffee Talk! One that I’ll be directing. Heyyyyyy. If you’re in or around Chicago, I’d love to see you at auditions. These shoots are quick and wonderful. It’s an excellent team!

February 11, 2014

dijpoetess:

slipperypeople:

Aerial | Baptise Debombourg.

Shattering glass flooding into a room of Brauweiler Abbey in Germany.

(Source: floatingiseasy, via amyyjjean)

February 8, 2014

chicagoscreenshots:

Paraiso2013

February 2, 2014

artmonia:

Incredible Shadow Art Created From Junk by Tim Noble & Sue Webster.

(via hannahology)

February 2, 2014
An Open Letter From Dylan Farrow

filmme-fatale:

I have to be honest with you guys: I’ve never been a huge fan of Woody Allen. I’ve empathized with some of his characters, and even enjoyed a couple of his films, but I never really liked the characters he wrote for himself. Not because his archetype is an uncomfortable, anxious narcissist, but because there was something about the way he wrote that I interpreted as emphatically trying to explain why he (perhaps, rather, his character) deserved love, particularly from young, beautiful women.

I was about 16 when I first heard of Mia Farrow’s 1993 allegations against him over sexually assaulting his adoptive daughter, Dylan. I wasn’t quite the self-identified aware feminist that I am now, so I didn’t know how to articulate why this story stuck with me, but I pretty much boycotted Allen films from then, on. I think even back then, I recognized that false accusations of sexual abuse and paedophilia are not a true statistic, and when someone comes out in the defense of a child, we must listen. It hurt even more to hear my classmates’ and teachers’ reactions - people who attended and worked at a prominent private arts school that prides itself on forward thinking. Eyes were rolled, groans oozed over slackened jaws. I felt empathy for Farrow’s daughters, and I was made to feel defeated for that. “Mia Farrow is crazy, though.” “It’s not our business to speculate.” “If you can’t accept that Woody Allen is innocent, at least admit that his movies are great, even if you’ve misunderstood him.”

I’ve misunderstood a man you don’t even know? You don’t know half of the hurt I’ve been told I’ve “misunderstood.” This is personal.

I don’t care if my opinion of this director is unpopular, nor do I care about what anyone thinks about the effectiveness or moral implications of boycotting something. What I do care about is victim advocacy and taking responsibility for the things I consume, particularly art. I will NOT separate the art from the artist. I WILL hold myself accountable for standing my moral ground, and everyone who chooses to share in my space. I CAN’T abide by artist worship when that artist has been alleged - TO THE BENEFIT OF NO-ONE - to have hurt someone! To have SEXUALLY ABUSED someone! A child!

This is Dylan’s time. She has never publicly spoken about this until now, and I urge all of you who follow me to read this. As a film consumer and a filmmaker, I take it upon myself to stay educated on the systems in which I am complicit. This is my stand. I stand with Dylan.

Also, needless to say, while I am not about to create a blacklist for our movie club, I personally have no desire to watch films that are created by or starring people who are alleged to have hurt people. I’ll write a section of the manifest breaking down how we’ll function around that.

Now please reblog the shit out of this so we can talk about it.

(via filmme-fatale)

January 31, 2014
Carolee Schneeman, ‘Pantheist’

experimentalcinema:

Breaking the Frame is what Canadian filmmaker Marielle Nitoslawska calls an “‘über-documentary.” Her film is a very personal immersion into the world of perhaps the most unique American female artist, Carolee Schnemann. Creatively active for more than five decades, a pioneer in performance art and avant-garde film, Schneemann has dedicated her energy and self to “breaking the frames” of the art world. Unlike many documentaries, Nitoslawska’s film is not an attempt to create an objective, linear portrayal of the artist. Throughout  the six years that took this project to blossom, her and Schneemann have become very close, and this intuitive understanding between them is reflected in the visual form of the film, as well as through other channels of its creative expression.

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